Ride Diary: Saturday 10/19

Weather started out cool. Wore my new long sleeved Novara jersey for the first time and needed my full fingered gloves.

Headed west via 26th Avenue and 32nd Avenue. Passed and was passed by many cyclists. Lots of groups out. I rode by a rather large one gathering at a church at 32nd Ave and McIntyre St. As I went by the Coor’s brewery, they went past me in a rather spirited fashion. They looked like they were having fun and ready to climb Lookout Mountain (I’ll do that one of these days).

Got to Vanover park in Golden. The leaves were falling on a couple of trees and presented an excellent photo op.

Autumn Ride

After a brief rest, turned my bike back around and went up Clear Creek. According the RideWithGPS app on my phone, I reached 37.5 MPH on a downhill section of this. If that’s true, I think that’s my record on a bicycle. Fortunately, the trail was completed devoid of other humans at that time.

Once I reached the I-70 underpass along the Clear Creek trail, I took a moment to debate if I wanted to keep heading up it, or head back home on the roads. I took the road option.

Turned down the Youngfield Service Rd and headed back east on 32nd Ave. At some point I ended up on 26th Ave and headed home.

Here’s my ride from the RideWithGPS app.

Bike Lock Strategies: The Ring Lock

Leave your bicycle unattended anywhere, and you’re going to worry about someone walking away with it. It’s important to have a good strategy for locking bicycles.

Many locking strategies often consist of carrying multiple items to lock your bike, such as multiple locks, or supplementing your lock(s) with cables. This is necessary because parts on modern bicycles are made to be easily removed, which is the opposite of what you want if you need to leave your bike unattended.

The ring lock, or frame lock, is not seen very often in the United States. Very common in Europe, the ring lock usually attaches to the seat stays, and immobilizes the bike by placing a metal rod through the wheel’s spokes. My primary commuter bicycle is equipped with one, and it is my favorite lock ever.

Ring Lock & Purple Tektro CantileverWhat’s great about the ring lock, the lock is always with my bicycle. I can put my key in it and immediately immobilize my bicycle. Great for quick trips.

Also, many ring locks like the ABUS Amparo pictured above have cables and chains you can plug into the side. This allows you to secure your bicycle to a stationary object such as a bike rack. Combine it with anti-theft skewers (such as Velo Orange’s) and you have a pretty decent bicycle theft prevention system.

Unfortunately, these are pretty difficult to obtain in the states.